This service converts digitized images to silver, 16mm microfilm. Because it’s simple, stable, compact and eye readable, microfilm continues to be the preferred medium for preserving permanent records. Beginning early in 1997, PFA was among the first companies to offer this elegant solution to preserving digital images.
We have four Kodak Archive Writers that convert over 100,000 digitized images to film each day. Prior to creating the film, we pre-processes the image files to be sure each image is valid and the file is complete. We enhance the images to improve their quality and verify that each image we receive has been recorded on film. Following these procedures, the film is processed in accordance with industry standards and delivered in plastic or cardboard boxes suitable for archival storage. Stored correctly, the microfilm produced by our process has a life expectancy of 500 years. More...
Computer technology is concerned with meeting the needs of the present and attempting to predict the direction of the future. Although PFA’s primary focus is integrating today’s records work with tomorrow’s technology, we must acknowledge the value of older technologies when using them makes sense. The use of microfilm for document preservation is a case in point. Electronic imaging is clearly superior to microfilm for the daily management of active records. This is not surprising when you consider that it was developed for just this purpose. The success of electronic imaging has cause some to label microfilm has an obsolete medium when, in reality, microfilm has come full circle and returned to its original purpose – that of disaster protection. For now, consider microfilm to be an insurance policy, something we prefer not to use but is of great value when we need it. Photos